5 Leadership Lessons from Steve Jobs

Ideas, Innovation, Leadership, Organization

Ask any person walking with a cell phone who Steve Jobs is and they’ll tell you.  They wait in line for hours to buy the next IPhone.  They hear smartphone and IPhone is the image that comes to mind.  Steve Jobs left the world with a product that is now a part of every day life.  

Most people are aware of his innovative approach to technology, business and how he made people better.  I find Steve Jobs to be one of those most influential, inspiring and innovative people in this generation.  I have listened to Steve Job’s Crazy Ones speech at least 500 times.  It gives me purpose.  It inspires me.  It opens possibilities that we are all better than we allow ourselves to be.  

As a leadership enthusiast, I want to point out some of my favorite quotes from Jobs that have inspired me to be a better leader.  We need to understand that Steve wasn’t just a brilliant innovator, but he was also a leader.  

“What leadership is is having a vision and being able to articulate that so that the people around you can understand it.” – Steve Jobs

If anyone is going to make that first step into leading, they MUST have vision.  Leaders must know where they’re taking their team.  Leading people implies we are going somewhere.  Leading implies we have a goal/objective to accomplish.  Leaders must create a vision to accomplish that goal.  Call it a plan, a path, an idea, but communicate it in such a way that your team can see what you see.  Communicate that vision clearly, concise and easy enough for their followers/team to understand. It’s one thing to know, it’s another to understand.  When we understand things, we get the full spectrum of what it is we’re about to do.  Thus, a leader must paint a vision so that their team can see it too.  

“My job is not to be easy on people. My job is to make them better.” – Steve Jobs

Leaders invest in people.  That’s what they do naturally.  They make people better.  Steve Jobs nails it.  A leader’s job isn’t to be easy on people, it’s to make them better.  If we’re going to invest in people, let’s make it count for them.  A leader must be honest with their team.  If a team member needs a wake up call, hold them accountable to the values and standards that are set in place.  It’s a leader’s job to coach, mentor and guide their team members to not only be better, but do better and know better.  Don’t forget that a leader focuses on people.  They are in a way, our soul purpose for being a leader.  We don’t just want to make them better, but also want to make them leaders.  

“You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards.” – Steve Jobs

Leaders want to know that what they’re doing is working.  They want to know that their leadership is effective.  They want to know that their vision is being carried out and that progress is being made.  There is only one way to check how you and your team is doing and that’s by stopping to assess where the team is and how they have been performing.  You can’t look forward to see that, you must look behind you to see how far the team has gone.  Looking back provides an opportunity to grow from your experience, the failure, the perseverance, the challenges you’ve faced and so on. It’s important that we look back to connect the dots, but don’t forget that more dots need to be made.  Don’t focus too much on the past, but look to the future.  Leading is about where we’re going, but we must learn and progress from where we’ve been.  

“Be a yardstick of quality.  Some people aren’t used to an environment where excellence is expected.” – Steve Jobs

Think from the follower’s perspective.  Followers want amazing leaders leading them. Leaders must be that quality that followers are looking for.  I’ll say this in the nicest way, but followers don’t need a half-ass leader.  They need someone who is of the utmost quality.  The quality of the leaders depends on the follower’s development, progress and effectiveness.  Leaders will always have a high standards of excellence for their team and their work environment.  A leader cares about how things are done.  They expect high quality results.  They expect high quality performance.  As a follower, be selective on who you follow.  Who you follow is not only important for the objectives and goals, but also important for the followers.  A leader will raise the bar for the benefit of their followers. They see your potential and will ensure that you are growing to meet it. 

“Innovation distinguishes between and leader and a follower.” – Steve Jobs 

This may be one of those most recognized quotes from Steve Jobs.  Some people have yet to understand the correlation between innovation and leadership, but it’s quite simple.  Innovation isn’t just an action, but being innovative is seeing outside the box.  Like innovators, leaders also see outside the box. Leadership and innovation are actions of a decision to not accept the normality of how people and products are grown. Leaders see around corners in ways that others don’t see.  They are strategic, they are creative, they are risk takers and they certainly don’t fear failure. It’s very important for leaders to see things in ways other people don’t.  A leader isn’t a leader because they have all the answers; a leader is a leader because if they don’t know an answer, they find or create their own solution to any challenge or issue. 

7 Ways to Foster an Open Door Policy

Leadership, Organization, Tips, Tricks

Communication is one if not the most important part of being in a team and or being a leader/supervisor.  You’ve probably heard dozens of times from your new boss or your supervisor that they have an open door policy.  An open door literally and metaphorically.  What that means is that their door is open for you to openly communicate about ideas, problems, information, etc.  It’s a simple idea and a very important avenue for bringing up issues as well as solutions among other things.  Sometimes it may just be to make small talk.  That three minute discussion on the weather is more important than you may realize.  How often is the phrase I have an open door policy really used to its greatest potential?  I am a firm believer in solving issues at the lowest level possible, but there may be certain cases where the leader/supervisor must be in the know on what’s going on.  In the specific cases of needing to speak to your leader/supervisor anyone should and must feel safe approaching their leadership to discuss matters.  In reality, issues or no issues, everyone should feel comfortable approaching their leadership.  Here are a few ways you, as a leader, can remove the hinges from the door and encourage, build and provide a place for open communication. 

Small talk – If the door was never opened you will need to create the culture in which your team knows they can come speak with you.  In order to build an environment for open communication you must initiate in some way the idea that talking is good for the team.  Making small talk builds the comfort level so that everyone is comfortable talking.  As a leader, engaging first is important.  Topics can be anything.  Sports, whether, news, movies, etc.  This shows your team that talking with leadership can be quite normal.  Often, team members feel as if talking with their leaders is foreign and unnatural.  Which is usually a sign of a disconnection between leaders and their teams.  If you’re building an open door relationship everyone must feel welcome and it must become a normal feeling.  Build that trust and comfort level with small talk.

Put the nerf gun away – Plain and simple.  Don’t shoot the messenger.  If people are fearful of your reaction to them bringing you information they’ll never want to speak to you when critical issues come up.  Allow them to say what they need to say without putting blame on the person bringing you the newspaper.  The purpose of an open door is to foster and encourage your team members to come to you.  Put the nerf gun away, you won’t need it. 

You have two ears and one mouth – I heard this in a church sermon once.  You have two ears and one mouth. You should listen twice as much as you speak.  If someone is approaching you with any dilemma, you should first listen.  Listen intently and with your utmost attention.  Perhaps the occasion doesn’t require a lengthy response.  It may just require your blessing with a simple, yes or no.  Whatever the case, listen first without distraction.  Turn to the person speaking whether you’re standing up or sitting down so that they know they have your attention.  Put down the electronic devices, perhaps even turn off your computer screen to avoid looking at it.  In any instance, listen. 

Everyone’s time is valuable – It is difficult to have an open door open every minute of every day.  You certainly want open communication, but at the same time you don’t need to be interrupted a hundred times a day.  In this case, leave the door open anyway.  Let’s face it, as a supervisor and leader of a team, your time matters just as theirs does.  You will be busy and there may be times when you may not have a moment to stop what you’re doing.  In this case, if you are busy and you can’t provide your undivided attention set up a time that allows enough time for discussion.  Don’t just tell the person no, or you can’t talk, but explain to them why you can’t talk that moment and that it’s not because you don’t want to.  Setting specific open hours dedicated to listening to your team may be something you have to do.  It’s okay to do that.  It will give your team members time to form their thoughts so they can bring it to you in an organized manner.

Empower your team – It’s probable that not ever problem needs immediate elevation to the leader or supervisor.  Ensure that your team knows that solving the issues at the lowest level is important.  Empower your team members to make decisions that are within their area of responsibility.  An effective team works together.  Encourage innovation and information sharing including ideas.  The solution may rest within another team member and may not need to be elevated.  Fostering open communication between team members is just as important as the communication with leaders. 

When your door is open you can walk out too –  Along the line of the team using each other’s skills in the group to resolve issues, you should do the same.  Your team matters.  Sometimes you may have an issue that you just can’t solve by yourself.  Instead of going to your leadership, if any, go to your team.  Your team can help you.  That’s what they’re there for.  Asking for their help ultimately removes the hinges from the door.  Imagine how you feel when someone walks into your office and needs your help.  You feel good.  You feel valuable.  Your team needs to feel that as well.  When you open the door, the door is open from both sides. Feel free to walk into their office. 

Know your people – There may be days when no one needs to talk, but as a leader, it’s your responsibility to know if your team members need to talk.  Knowing your people will help you see and know if something is up with any of them.  If it’s personal most people won’t come forward right away, but an open door policy includes personal issues.  You may not be an expert in the problem, but allowing them to vent may be the thing they need.  Get to know your team members.  Use feedback sessions to talk a bit about them.  Use small talk to learn facts about them.  The better you know them the better you can lead them. 

At the end of the day if your team isn’t coming to you for any reason you need to reassess why.  Great leaders are great communicators which means communication should be a fluid action.  Ensure that above all, as a leader, you have an open door that fosters an environment for creativity, idea flow, information sharing, trust, and growth.  

5 Ways to Help You Lead in a New Environment

Ideas, Innovation, Leadership, Organization, Social, Tips, Tricks

It would be naive to think that one leadership or management strategy is going to work exactly the same from environment to environment.  It’s just not that easy.  Every organization, work center, company, and or course, the military will have different ways of operating.  After all, they all have different missions.

I am now working in my fifth work center in the last six years. I didn’t have a full spectrum of the mission or what I’d be doing.  I did have to put my learning cap on and embrace the change. A question that has come to mind lately is how do I lead in an environment that I am unfamiliar with?  After brainstorming with my mentor and close friend I have narrowed down some ways. Here are 5 ways to get your foot in the door into leading in a new environment.

Learn the mission!  You have to know what the overall mission is and you have to know your role in the mission.  Know your limits of responsibility and know your strengths and weaknesses given the new mission.  Everyone has a specific amount of responsibility over their area. Know where your role begins and ends. Ask yourself what you bring to the table? What are you good at and what do you need work at? You will need to self assess your strengths/weaknesses in this new environment. Play your strengths when you are able and learn when you are unfamiliar with the process or directions. Ask questions when you don’t know an answer or a process. It’s okay to ask other agencies how they fit in the mission. You need to see the big picture and not just the area around you. Knowing the mission and knowing your role will ultimately help move the mission forward.

Introductions! Aside from knowing the mission, you have to know the team you’re a part of. In order to work on a team you’ve got to know the team and the team has to know you. First impressions are very important, but we can never truly know someone by a simple greeting.  After personal introductions have been made, lay the foundation of your work ethic. Begin to show your work ethic. This is where people will truly get a sense of who you are. Lead with values, not authority.  Values provide a standard of positive behavior. Use them and add other values that instill a strong work ethic. Get to know how your team members operate. Seek what drives their performance.  Ask them questions about their passions, their family, their background.  Leading is ultimately about taking care of people.  One must know their teammates on a professional and personal level in order to be effective at taking care of them. After all, leadership is about taking care of people. Know your team!

Be proactive, not reactive!  Don’t wait for someone to tell you to do something.  Take initiative in your area.  Seek out and find what needs to be done or what could be done.  There is always someone who needs help.  Go ask them if you can help or if there is anything you can do to help.  If you know what needs to be done, do it.  If you don’t, then ask someone what you can do to contribute. This is why knowing the mission is important.  It will give you an idea on what needs to be done.  When you’re proactive you stay ahead of the game.  Doing so can often help save you and others time in the future. Being proactive means you’re prepared.  No one likes the feeling of being unprepared. Take initiative every chance you get!  It may lead to some great opportunities! Nothing is more satisfying to a supervisor than seeing a subordinate take charge.  This not only tells them you have a great work ethic, but that you are capable of leading. Be proactive!

Communicating clearly.  Communication is a very hard skill to master.  For someone to put thoughts or an idea into words, or better yet, action, it can be quite difficult if you don’t understand how each member of your team listens or learns.  To clearly get your objectives across to your team can be very delicate.   Make sure you take time to get the correct words down before you speak your objectives/tasks/ideas, etc. The precision of your communication can make or break the success of your team.  And always make sure that your team members know to ask questions if they don’t clearly understand the objective.  That is also another part of communication.  It’s a two way street.  Ensure you communicate clearly and ensure your team knows how to seek answers from you by asking. Listening and hearing are two different things.  Listening is an audible action, hearing what’s said is the process of information into a structured concept.  Communicate clearly so that your point is heard.

Be willing to learn!  A leader’s job isn’t to know all of the answers.  Leaders must show they are willing to learn from their team members.  Listening and learning from the members on the team builds trust.  When teams learn from each other it strengthens their ability to adapt to overcome challenges. It creates a teamwork environment.  When leaders and members of the team are open to learning from each other it also creates a culture of learning.  Learning is how we grow.  Show them that if you can, they can.  Learn together!

My First Deployment: A Joint Environment – 4 Leadership Lessons

Leadership

I was on vacation in Texas with my wife and daughter.  We were vising family, enjoying being away from our normal routine in Colorado.  My Superintendent calls and says, well, I have some bad news.  You’ve been hit with a deployment.

Nothing really bad about it, just wasn’t expecting to get tagged as I just got to the unit 6 months prior.  It happens, I’ve been tagged with less time on station before, but it got canceled. What do you do when you’re tasked to deploy? You begin to prepare and roll with the punches. 

Four months later I got on a plane and flew out of the US for the first time in my life.  Was I nervous?  Yes!  I wasn’t being tasked with a group of people.  I was alone and I didn’t know what to expect.  After almost missing my international flight, I was finally able to relax on a long 9 hour flight to Zurich and then another 9 hour flight to Muscat, Oman.  You see, this was no ordinary report to an Air Force base and begin your time. There was no base.  There were no dorms. There were no chow halls. There was the Embassy. I was tasked to work at a U.S. Embassy. I didn’t even know such a tasking existed.  No one ever talks about this sort of tasking.  It was going to be interesting.

This was a joint environment. Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force.  I was around other branches actively for the first time in my career.  What do you do when you find yourself learning the culture of other branches? You become a sponge and start learning the best you can. Sadly, I just wasn’t up to par on how other branches operate.  I highly respect my brothers and sisters in arms from other branches, but I honestly don’t know much about the other branches.  I was not only about to learn a new position, but I was about to learn how to work with other services on a different level than the usual operations that I was accustomed to in the Air Force.

If you know me, I don’t take part in anything without trying to learn something about leadership.  Thus, after 20 hours of flying back home, reflecting and analyzing what I just did for the last six months I have narrowed down the lessons I’ve learned while working in a joint service environment.

Teamwork makes the dream work.  When you combine multiple cultures into one culture, things can get tough. Everyone comes from different backgrounds, different terminology, different skills and everyone had different missions that contribute to the overall mission. We all had our own missions to do, but when someone needed the assistance from someone else, you had their attention. When you have the cooperation of others that agree on the same solution while striving for a shared/common goal, you get success.  I learned that when you need help to make progress, find out who the subject matter expert is on the team so they can bring their skills to the court.  You can’t win alone.  Use your team when necessary.  Leaders don’t lead because they know all of the answers, they lead knowing that diversity is a great team asset.  Teamwork is viable and valuable. If you can’t take another step, someone on your team will be able to help you take it.  Leaders utilize their team members effectively.

The right environment makes a difference.  I was the lowest ranking member in the office.  In fact, we only had three enlisted members in the office.  Everyone else was an officer.  As the new guy in the office learning not only about the job, but the people and their mission, I was a sponge taking in information on a level I’ve never known.  Given that it was a joint environment, the people around me helped me learn, at my pace, how they operated and how they contributed to the mission.  They didn’t get frustrated that I didn’t know certain processes or procedures, but they adjusted as needed to fit my learning needs.  They didn’t expect me to know everything.  They created an environment of progress and learning.  Adjusting to a new position was going to take a little time. Leaders are adaptable.  They are able to change approaches on a whim.  I am thankful for the officers who were patient with me as I learned about my job, learned about them and learned about the whole mission.  They helped me learn effectively and they taught me effectively. The environment, in a way, changed to fit my knowledge, but yet remained in a progressive state.  I believe if I entered a work environment that demanded instant knowledge, instant responses, instant right answers that I would have been overly stressed making the office a place I didn’t want to be in.  I’m thankful to learn the importance of culture in a joint level. An effective work culture contributes to the effectiveness of the office. The people can make that happen and it’s people that should make that happen. Leaders are adaptable and create environments fit for growth.

Communication is key for any team to function.  There were some days where everyone was in the office and some days where only a few remained in the office.  Communication goes a long way and without communication no team can function fluidly.  We had meetings Sunday morning and Thursday afternoon.  Sunday morning was a time to say, hey, here is what is going on this week.  Thursday was a time to reflect on what happened during the week as preparation for the next.  Although, at first, I really didn’t see the need for two meetings a week, but looking back, these meetings were very important. Even though, I had a small role in them, for the big picture, they were crucial. This was the time where we all came together in one room to talk through issues and how we were going to fix them. This wasn’t a time just for updates, but this was a time to communicate.  Communication was the driving force for this.  Everyone had their chance to speak and everyone had a chance to listen, learn, provide feedback, and provide ideas/suggestions.  Without this circle of communication, getting everyone on the same page would take a lot more effort and time.  I’ve been through many staff meetings and some seem like a waste of time, lack purpose and boring.  I began to look at these meetings as the chance to communicate. As everyone had their own agenda during the week and turned many pages, this time allowed everyone to sync up and get on the same page.  Communication was key in making this happen. Leaders communicate. 

You’ve got to have balance! When you’re away from your family during the holidays, it can take a hit on your spirit and your morale. The best thing about this deployment was that when we weren’t at work, we weren’t working. Haha. The people around me would always have something going on that allowed us to hang out, relax, and keep the morale up. Weather it was a camping trip, a hiking trip, a site seeing trip, or even just going out to eat, it was an important time to balance the week out.  Balance is very important even when you’re not deployed.  Although, I wasn’t around my family, we became like a family. We made sure there was a time for fun. It wasn’t forced, like “mandatory fun,” it was genuine fun.  I find that foreign in our culture sometimes. We try to force it with fun runs, BBQs, etc. Sometimes the best thing to do is provide the opportunity and those who want to show up can voluntarily show up.  Balance helped me stay positive and grateful.  I met awesome people and I’m grateful they provided the opportunity to have a little fun while being away from my family. Leaders provide balance. 

Reviving Core Values

Leadership, Organization

Every day I walk up a flight of stairs to my office where I work as NCOIC, Administration Management. On the first set of stairs, there are three steps that have one Air Force core value written on each of them.  Integrity, Service, Excellence. These core values are burned into the memory of every Airman since day one of basic training. They are meant to guide us. They are meant to be lived. They are meant to be a path of being better, doing better and knowing better. Yet, at times, we, members in the Air Force, undervalue and underutilize our core values. 

Values drive the behavior of any organization, not just the military. Values are set so that the people in the organization have a guiding light, a north star to show which direction to go when we’re lost and to remind us that although, people fail, our values cannot. Values will be rock solid. Values will never fail you. Values will always be there when you need them.

An organization that doesn’t have a set of values setting the behavior of the organization will often fail. It would be as if the organization is walking blindly. Our Air Force core values are easy to understand. Opportunities are birthed every day that allow us to perform our core values. Values are not meant to be used sparingly, they are meant to be used at every opportunity that arises. It’s how we create a culture of positive behavior. We can correlate a core value into almost every decision and every action and if we’re dedicated to actually living them, we’ll never be wrong. Though, we can fail as people and as a leader, it doesn’t mean values have failed you, it just means that you’ve failed at what you’re doing.  Ret. Gen Stanley McCrystal once said, “Leaders can let you fail and yet not let you be a failure.”  The same goes for our core values.  Though, you, a person may fail, if your core values are the heart of your actions, you will not be a failure.  It just means you have to try again.

Sure, we hear them, read them and every Airman is given a coin that has them embedded in it, but are we using them to the fullest potential? Even more, are we, as a team and individuals using them at all? Is it even possible to live them constantly every day? I like to think that if we gave a little more effort into living our core values how awesome our leadership would be and how awesome our teams would be. Walking up the steps to my office while reading our core values challenges me to live them. Just like in any busy work culture, it’s easy to overlook our values. I’m guilty of it, I’m sure others are too. Will there be days that you just don’t feel like putting in the effort? Of course, but our core values even address that behavior. 

The Air Force provides a definition for each core value(can be found here), but is that the end all be all to the core values? No. They can mean different things to different people and can be elaborated on.  What do you think they mean?  It’s a question that we, as an entire organization sort of forgot about as we engage in our daily duties and I believe our core values need to be given the attention they deserve. Right? Our culture depends on it.  Lately, it seems we’ve lost sight of our values and that’s okay, we’re human, we forget things, we know life is busy. It’s never too late to revive them and use them to improve our culture. Our core values have unlimited value.

Above all else, values help us be and become better leaders. When we feel our teams slipping in character, judgement and performance, we should always look at our values.  They’ll keep us in line and keep us moving forward.  Values create a work environment fit to thrive and survive.  Here is my personal look at how I apply and see the Air Force core values. I hope over the next few days or weeks you consider writing your perspective on the core values.  Share your perspective with your team, use it as a topic of professional development.  Get to know your Airman’s perspective to see how they view them.

Integrity first –  It’s not just about doing the right thing when no one is watching, it’s also about holding yourself accountable when no one is watching.   This also includes you holding your team members accountable.  It’s about carrying out your responsibilities accurately and effectively as possible. Show humility when you don’t have the answer. It’s okay to be wrong. Own your mistakes.  Be transparent in what you do. Keep true to yourself and be a person others can count on.  Integrity is about how the team is held together.  Make sure there are no kinks in your line that can jeopardize how the team holds on together. 

Service before self There will be days when you wake up and you just don’t feel like it.  We’ve all had those days and we will have more. What we do as Airman is bigger than ourselves.  It’s bigger than our personal desires.  Service before self is simple.  Your duties come first to include the service of leadership.  It’s about taking care of people as well. People are a part of the service so they must be taken care of so they can take care of the mission. Personal desires can always be put be aside to handle an issue/task/challenge at hand. This is not about you, it’s about the team.  When the team wins, you win.

Excellence in all we do –  My middle school coach used to say, “Go hard or go home.”  That was the standard.  Was it possible to give your full 100% every single football practice? No, but it wasn’t just about your physical ability. It was about your mentality, your heart, your attention, your dedication. It was more than running hard or hitting hard. It was the effort, the approach to the game. We must not only do our best, but whatever we do must be done with the results of great effort.  It’s hard to really measure effort, but people can always tell when you are giving less than what you are capable of giving. Whatever we’re working on, the end goal, must reflect excellence. Don’t commit to something unless you can give your absolute full attention and effort it deserves. One of my favorite quotes is from one of my favorite runners Steve Prefontaine. “To give any less than your best is to sacrifice a gift.” There is no time for slacking, half-assing, or procrastination.  If you’re going to do a job, do it right.  In the words of Deadpool, “Maximum effort.”

Lessons from a Boulder Street Performer

Leadership, Life, Social

Today, my cousin and I drove into Boulder to find a place to eat. We went down to Pearl St to see what wasn’t too packed. We walked up the strip and we saw a guy giving high 5s and hugs.

If you know Pearl St, it’s a very cultural diverse area. People are singing, asking for money, juggling, balancing acts, a bunch of sidewalk performers. Anyways, so we walk around and saw this guy and then we turned around and ate a pizza place near where we saw him.

We started to observe him a bit more to see more of what he was doing. If you view the tweet you will see him hug a guy in a red shirt. Also, there is a guy in a white bandanna that eventually turned around and walked back to him to take a hug from him.

He did this for about an hour, he would yell with enthusiasm every time someone engaged in a high five or hug. He was very enthusiastic! So after an hour, he then walked over and grab a guitar. He then started singing to people. Now, most performers here stay in one spot and usually expect people to draw to them. Of all the performers on the street, he is the only one that would go to people. He was very interactive. Some people would do a little dance, some people would literally wait for him to stop to take a picture and he’d give them a hug and high five.

Though I observed a stranger giving high fives and hugs, I observed a few other things…

One, from a business standpoint, if you’re selling a product you can’t expect people to run to you, you’ve got to establish a rapport with your target audience. This guy did that. My thought was he’s probably trying to get people to listen to him play and sing, but by spending an hour giving people high fives and hugs, he invested in them and took interest in them. People noticed and people gave him the time to listen. He didn’t shove his product down their throat, he took time to groom his audience and gave them something before asking for something(and he really didn’t need to ask, they gave without him asking). Build that rapport. 

Two, people skills are an overlooked subject in today’s business. Businesses want to hire people based off the knowledge they may have or received from experience or college. Knowledge may get the job done, but it may not keep you in business. This guy had a way of inspiring people that made people want to be around him. Strangers who in a short time invested in his product of compassion, love, and all around kindness. People skills are something that can be difficult to learn, you either have them or you don’t. This guy had incredible people skills. It was plain to see that he wasn’t there for him, he was there to give and people accepted it. Invest in people skills. 

Three, although many people were susceptible to his kindness there were a lot of people that weren’t and that’s when I realized how kindness has become such a foreign interaction. We automatically think, “What do you want from me?” After talking with him after we ate, we asked him why he did what he was doing. His response was, “I just like to make people happy. I’m not here to really make money. I want to make people happy with everything I do, high fives, hugs, singing.” Be kind, people need it and it doesn’t hurt if you need it too.

Four, he didn’t expect people to come to him, he went to them. He met them were they were. He gave, gave, and gave some more. Selflessness in such a simple way and he was making many people happy. Be a little more selfless. 

I was really inspired by this guy. Before giving him a hug and a high five, I told him, “You’ve gotta keep doing what you’re doing. You’ve got a talent that people take for granted. Develop your craft and keep inspiring. Whatever your goals are, this is what will get you to them.” He spends a lot time making others happy, perhaps he just needs someone to show him a little encouragement. He gave his appreciation to us and we had to leave.

His name is Pir. He is basically on the verge of being homeless, but I doubt anyone ever could take away his happiness. He’s got goals to go to college soon and I hope he gets through it. He’s got great potential to be a great leader.  If I owned a company or a business I would hire him on the spot.  He’s the kind of people you want engaging with your customers.  If you’re in Boulder on Pearl St and a guy is giving free hugs and high fives, it’s probably Pir.  Give him a hug or a high five,  he deserves it!

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Captain America–Communicating

Leadership

We take lessons from the obvious occurrences, such as Captain America leading the Avengers to victory, but there are times when we have to take the negative aspects of a scene to extract the lesson.  In Captain America: The Winter Soldier, there were a few moments where information was withheld from Captain America.  Nick Fury’s idea is that if not everyone knows the secrets, then not one person can spill them all.  This is a great concept and perhaps it could/does work, but what happens when a person such as Captain America would work more efficiently and effectively if he knew what was going on with all his teammates?

Steve Rogers: You just can’t stop yourself from lying, can you?
Nick Fury: I didn’t lie. Agent Romanoff had a different mission than yours.
Steve Rogers: Which you didn’t feel obliged to share.
Nick Fury: I’m not obliged to do anything.
Steve Rogers: Those hostages could have died, Nick.
Nick Fury: I sent the greatest soldier in history to make sure that didn’t happen.
Steve Rogers: Soldiers trust each other. That’s what make it an army. Not a bunch of guys running around shooting guns.

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It’s important to know what’s going on so perhaps the task of others isn’t jeopardized.  Members of the team may have different objectives, but teams work together and inform each other of what they may need help with.  Perhaps Capt could have lead his team to an even more effective mission if he knew about Romanoff’s mission. 

Communication is key!

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When we communicate with each other on the same level, teams build trust, they build a great atmosphere to work with each other.  Leaders enforce that by sharing information with their team members.  They let them know what’s out in front so that the team can accomplish the mission to it’s utmost quality.  

Steve Rogers: I can’t lead a mission when the people I’m leading have missions of their own.

It’s tough to lead people when people are working independently.  This is why communication is important to leaders.  They not only should know, but they’ve got to know.  They are overall responsible for their team’s well-being and progress.  Leaders not only share knowledge, but with communication they let their team members know how they’re doing by providing feedback, they give recognition and they motivate.  

The art of communication is the language of leadership – James Humes

We don’t have to carry a vibranium shield, wear a cape, or even have amazing combative skills to be a hero.  We can be a hero by communicating effectively with those around us.  Captain America, even when he appeared in Avengers and Avengers: Age of Ultron,  emphasizes communication being a key part of leading.  Lead like Captain America. 

2 Points Leaders Should Execute

Leadership

Leaders lead teams. Every team is different and every team has a different mission. Leaders are developed to be able to lead teams in many circumstances. That’s what makes them leaders. They’re able to take any team and get them where they need to be.  Of course, there are many other qualities a leader must possess, but to hit the ground running here are two key points that every leader should execute.

Direction-Every leader needs to know where they are taking their team. Leaders must know how to get their team from point A to point B. Most importantly, they also need to know why they’re going in that direction in the first place. Leadership is not about where you’ve been it’s about where you’re going. Leaders know where to take their team.

Communication-Team members can translate things different if the leader does not articulate the goal or mission. Leaders communicate in depth to their team members on what’s going on and why. This helps members contribute if they have all the variables, or at least as many as possible. Leaders must listen and speak with, not at their team members. They must know when their team members need the extra push and when to allow their potential to shine. Leaders communicate effectively and often.